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The award-winning Phase Change Matters blog tracks the latest news and research on phase change materials and thermal energy storage. E-mail tips and comments to Ben Welter, communications director at Entropy Solutions. Follow the blog on Twitter at @PureTemp. Subscribe to the weekly PCM newsletter. Or join the discussion on LinkedIn.

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BioPCM featured in case study of Australian home

Ben Welter - Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Phase Change Energy Solutions' BioPCM is being used in the upstairs walls of a house in Victoria, Australia.  “Everything is effectively the same as a reverse brick veneer system," said Jeremy Spencer, director of the Melbourne firm that designed the house. "But instead of bricks we have the phase change material that sits inside the cavity and behind plasterboard internal wall." The project is profiled in InfoLink, "Australia's Architecture, Building, Construction and Design Directory." 

Outlast introduces new PCM-based filler material

Ben Welter - Friday, November 14, 2014

Outlast Technologies’ new Universe climate-control material is designed for use in bedding and apparel. The material is a combination of 70 percent down and 70 PCM-laden viscose fibers. Thicker fibers carry a greater amount of phase change material. “The performance compared to a standard PCM viscose fibre here is four times higher,” says Martin Bentz, managing director of Outlast Europe.

The science of phase change: It’s (more) complicated

Ben Welter - Thursday, November 06, 2014

Think you know how phase change works? You might need to rethink that. Researchers at Princeton, Peking University and New York University say the process is a lot more complex than previously known. "This research shows that phase changes can follow multiple pathways, which is counter to what we've previously known," explains Mark Tuckerman, a professor of chemistry and applied mathematics at NYU and one of the study's co-authors. "This means the simple theories about phase transitions that we teach in classes are just not right."